The history of Gables On The Park began Circa 1886!

455 Nelson Avenue Plan 65, Pt Lt
The Charles Chisholm Summer Cottage (Chisholm House)

HISTORY:

Plan 65 was a residential subvision of "Villa Lots', registered in 1874 by Benjamin Eager, who had purchased the Brant Farm from John Chisholm in the 1860s. Eager's survey extended from the Lake Shore Road (not then called Water Street) to north of Ontario Street, and from St Luke's "Church Avenue" to the "Road to Hamilton" (now called Maple Avenue).

Lot 9 was bought in 1874 by William Bunton, who sold it in 1877 to Alexander Stuart; in 1884 it was sold by his heir Elizabeth Nelles to Charles Edward Chisholm. In the same year Lot 7 was bought by his brother George Dudley Chisholm, who took a mortgage to build a summer house on that lot. Inl'A Walking Tour of Downtown Burlington 2", prepared by LACAC in 1978, it is stated that "445 and 455 [Nelson Avenue] were owned by the Chisholm brothers and were built about 1886, probably as summer cottages."

In the early 1890s Charles married Martha Fonger, thus joining two of the early families of the area. The Chisholm family owned the home until 1975. In the 1917 Sewerage Works Plan it is shown as owned by Charles Chisholm. The 1919 Voters List includes Chas Chisholm and David Chisholm at Lot 9 Nelson. In 1928 it passed to Charles Chisholm's sons David & Norman Chisholm. In the 1930s David brought his bride Lillian or Lily Jones to live here. The upstairs bathroom and modern kitchen were added then. David Chisholm worked in the Waterworks department of the Town of Burlington. In 1975 the widow of David Chisholm sold the house to Heidi James ... in 1993 it was owned by Roy & Wendy Howarth, who designated it. They sold it in 1995 to ...

ARCHITECTURE: The house is a single detached Victorian cottage, rectangular plan, rising to one and and a half storey. There is a wing to the rear, and a porch on the fornt, both of one storey. The partial basement is of rubble stone. The exterior wall material is a combination of the original wood on the lower portion and replacement cedar shingle on the upper section. The wood is shiplap siding. The front porch and rear wing are of plain clapboard. The roof is a medium gable, with an attached pyramidal porch roof. A red brick single stack chimney rises from the centre right section of the roof. The horizontal finish on the long side of the roof is cornice boxed and the soffit is sloped. On the rear wing there is only a facsia trimming. The front gable features delicate "gingerbread1 bargebaord. The main windows feature a shaped plain lintel, with plain sides and ledge, all of wood.

ENVIRONMENT:

In its location at the comer of Nelson and Elgin (originally the radial railway), the home is part of a streetscape integral to the part of the city's past as a summer resort location. In fact there is a distinct resemblance between the row of cottages here and the well known cottages in Chatauqua, New York built in the late 1870s. With the surrounding mature trees, the park, and the Burlington Cultural Centre across the road, the house makes an importnat contribution to this aspect of the city's history. A Burlington Historical Society plaque identifies the home's origins.

USABILITY:

The single family residential use is compatible with the neighbourhood. Services are all good.

INTEGRITY:

The site is original. The original cedar shingle roof has been overlaid with asphalt shingles. The lower portion of the house retains the original wood sidign, however the upper portion has been re-sided in cedar shingles. This upper portion had been covered in asphalt shingle material. It is uncertain what the original material was since a remnant of shingle was found under the asphalt, but a newspaper article mentions only "white frame" (Gwelda Fontaine, Burlington Post, April 22,1981). Like the wood siding, the front door, the windows and their trim and gingerbread are original. All have been carefully scraped and repainted by the current owners. The siding on the rear wing has been replaced with wood siding, especially ordered by the present owners to match the original. The home is in excellent condition.

(Heritage Award in 1993 for these improvements)

Extensive repairs and renovations have been done to the interior, all in keeping with the character of the house. All woodwork and the floors have been refinished, and a new kitchen installed.

EVALUATION:B: of importance

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:

Built circa 1892 for Charles Chisholm, this modest dwelling is a good example, in excellent condition, of the Victorian summer cottage prevalent in the community at that time. Originally a summer home, just "steps to the lake", it retains most of its original features, which include the shiplap wood siding on the lower portion, the windows and trim, the doors and the delicate "gingerbread" bargeboard. Located in a block with other similar cottages, it is significant in preserving the character of the neighbourhood, originally as a summer resort community.

DESIGNATION REPORT prepared in 1992 by JanisTopp; revised August 1995 by JaneIrwin

451 Nelson AvenuePlan 65, Pt Lt81894 The Thomas Rogers House (Maple House)

HISTORY

Plan 65 was a residential subvision of "Villa Lots", registered in 1874 by Benjamin Eager, who had purchased the Brant Farm from John Chisholm in the 1860s. Eager's survey extended from the Lake Shore Road (not then called Water Street) to north of Ontario Street, and from St Luke's "Church Avenue" to the "Road to Hamilton" (now called Maple Avenue).

Lot 8 was bought in 1874 by Charlotte & William Minhinnick, who sold it in 1890 to Charles F. Coleman. He took mortgages in 1890 and again in 1894 to build this house and its neighbour at 447 Nelson (on the other part of Lot 8), and also two other identical houses on Ontario Street: 1286 and 1290. All four identical houses, and a similar one at 1280 Ontario, were all built by the Coleman brothers in 1894 or 1895, as speculative projects.

The Coleman brothers were the village's major builders between 1890 and 1900. In 1887 A. B. Coleman built a brick house for himself at 479 Nelson Avenue (designated under the Ontario Heritage Act in 1982) and in 1893 he built a large frame house for himself at 1375 Ontario Street, "The Gingerbread House". He and Charles Coleman also built two large frame houses: Charles Coleman's own residence, "Idylwild" at 1337 Ontario Street, with its prospect down Nelson Avenue, in 1888; and 470 Nelson Avenue (designated in 1982), in 1885. Charles Coleman's painting and decorating company must have done the exterior and interior finishing of these houses. Their brother James, a carpenter, is no doubt responsible for the decorative woodwork and trim which is characteristic of Coleman-built houses.

In 1892 A. B. Coleman purchased the Brant House property and transformed it by constructing the Brant Hotel, in 1900. Coleman then moved to Toronto, where his large construction projects included some buildings at the Canadian National Exhbition grounds, Shears Hippodrome, and Convocation Hall at the University of Toronto. He also built Westminster Hospital in London and the buildings at the Fort Erie Race Track. His first Burlington period was a forerunner of these provincially significant construction projects. He later returned to develop Indian Point.

The house was bought in 1909 by David Acland & wife; it was sold in 1911 from his estate to Thomas & Margaret Rogers. In the 1917 Sewerage Works Plan it is shown as owned by Mrs Thomas Rogers. The 1919 Voters List includes Thomas Rogers, Machinist, "half of [Lot] 8" Nelson. In 1934 the property was sold to William Sargent; in 1941 from his widow to Giovannio Ditomasso (aka John Thomas).

1910 Map: 32 Nelson. 1924 Map: 20 Nelson. LACAC:"WalkingTour of Downtown Burlington#2" Helga V. Loverseed, Burlington: An Illustrated Histoy, p. 108 (illus).

ARCHITECTURE:

A one-and-a-half-storeyfront-gabled frame cottage with a second-level enclosed verandah above an open verandah on the lower level. Originally identical to 447 Nelson and two cottages on Ontario Street. The original fish-scale shingles and bargeboard gable trim on the front gable. The open verandah is supported by three original turned posts, echoed above by turned corner posts. The spooled work below the upper verandah is echoed by the lower veranda railing. Original storm door and windows.

ENVIRONMENT:

Nelson Avenue has long been recognized as a heritage streets-cape of great significance in downtown Burlington. This house and its neighbors are illustrated in Helga Loverseed's Burlington: A n Illustrated History . The property owners have been strong conservationists of the heritage streets cape. Two of the earliest designations in Burlington were 470 and 479 Nelson Avenue (both in 1982).455 Nelson Avenue was recognized by a HeritageAward in 1992 and designated in 1993. In The Downtown Urban Design f3Building Facade Improvement Study (1989) it was recommended that the Nelson Avenue area be designated as a Heritage Conservation District. Momentum 88 included Nelson Avenue in an area whose "homes represent a valuable urban resource and make a significant contribution to the character of the Downtown". Located across from the Burlington Art Centre and Brock Park, this is a neighborhood landmark.

USABILITY :

The house has been renovated and upgraded for contemporary residential use.

INTEGRITY :

The original clapboard has been covered over with aluminum siding. The verandah railing has been restored and the verandah repaired. The side chimey is new or rebuilt. Rear addition, compatible with the original structure. Recent repainting in three colours "picks out" the details of the decorative wood trim. Of the four houses which were originally almost identical, this house is closest to its original condition

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:

Built circa 1894 by A.B. Coleman, who was then the Village of Burlington's major builder and developer, this frame structure has retained many of the architectural features characteristic of Coleman's houses. The two-storey verandah, open at ground level and enclosed by glazed panels at the second level, has decorative carpentry work: turned posts, railings, fretwoork, gingerbread trim, and fish-scale shingles. The house makes a strong contribution to the Victorian heritage streetscape of Nelson Avenue.

Designation report prepared by JanisTopp and JaneIrwin, September 1993; revised August 1995

447 Nelson Avenue Plan 65, Pt Lt 81894 The Thomas Dunbar House (Gable House)

Plan 65 was a residential subvision of "Villa Lots", registered in 1874 by Benjamin Eager, who had purchased the Brant Farm from John Chisholm in the 1860s. Eager's survey extended from the Lake Shore Road (not then called Water Street) to north of Ontario Street, and from St Luke's "Church Avenue" to the "Road to Hamilton" (now called Maple Avenue).

Lot 8 was bought in 1874 by Charlotte & William Minhinnick, who sold it in 1890 to Charles F. Coleman. He took mortgages in 1890 and again in 1894 to build this house and its neighbour a t 451 Nelson (on the other part of Lot 8), and also two other identical houses on Ontario Street: 1286 and 1290. All four identical houses, and a similar one at 1280 Ontario, were built by the Coleman brothers in 1894 or 1895, as speculative projects.

The Coleman brothers were the village's major builders between 1890 and 1900. In 1887 A. B. Coleman built a brick house for himself at 479 Nelson Avenue (designated under the Ontario Heritage Act in 1982) and in 1893 he built a large frame house for himself at 1375 Ontario Street, "The Gingerbread House". He and Charles Coleman also built two large frame houses: Charles Coleman's own residence, "Idylwild" at 1337 Ontario Street, with its prospect down Nelson Avenue, in 1888; and 470 Nelson Avenue (designated in 1982), in 1885. Charles Coleman's painting and decorating company must have done the exterior and interior finishing of these houses. Their brother James, a carpenter, is no doubt responsible for the decorative woodwork and trim which is characteristic of Coleman-built houses.

In 1892 A. B. Coleman purchased the Brant House property and transformed it by constructing the Brant Hotel, in 1900. Coleman then moved to Toronto, where his large construction projects included some buildings at the Canadian National Exhibition grounds, Shea's Hippodrome, and Convocation Hall at the University of Toronto. He also built Westminster Hospital in London and the buildings at the Fort Erie Race Track. His first Burlington period was a forerunner of these provincially significant construction projects. He later returned to develop Indian Point.

The house was bought in 1901 by Thomas Dunbar. The 1917 Sewerage Works Plan shows the property as owned by Mrs T. Dunbar. In 1917 Susannah Dunbar sold it to Edward Dix, who is included in the 1919 Voters List as owning ['half of [lot] 8" on Nelson; in 1936 it was sold to George Ghent; in 1941 to Harry & Margaret Springer; in 1947 t o Percy & Hannah Blackman; and in 1964 from Mrs Blackman, to Russell & Lillian Brown. The present owners are Fran & Mike Allen.

1910 GOAD Map: 36 Nelson. 1924 GOAD Map: 18 Nelson

ARCHITECTURE:

Originally, this one-and-a-half-storey front-gabled frame cottage was clad with wood shiplap siding, a characteristic cladding for the frame houses built by the Coleman brothers. The front elevation originally featured a second-level open "sleeping porch" above an open verandah on the lower level. The front gable is embellished with the original fish-scale shingles, defined by a lower band with relief rosettes, and bargeboard gable trim of lace-edged cutout wood. The front verandah is supported by three original tumed posts, which are echoed above by tumed corner posts. There was originally spooled work below the upper verandah, which was echoed by the lower verandah railing.

ENVIRONMENT:

Nelson Avenue has long been recognized as a heritage streetscape of great significance in downtown Burlington. This house and its neighbours are illustrated in Helga Loverseed's Burlington: An Illustrateed Hisfoy . The property owners have been strong conservationists of the heritage streetscape. Two of the earliest designations in Burlington were 470 and 479 NelsonAvenue(both in1982).455 Nelson Avenue was recognized by a HeritageAward in 1992 and designated in 1993. In The Downtown Urban Design6 Building Facade Improvement Study (1989) it was recommended that the Nelson Avenue area be designated as a Heritage Conservation District. Momentum 88 included Nelson Avenue in an area whose "homes represent a valuable urban resource and make a significant contribution to the character of the Downtown". Located across from the Burlington Art Centre and Brock Park, this is a neighbourhood landmark.

USABILITY:

The house has been renovated and upgraded for contemporary residential use.

INTEGRITY:

The house has been renovated, with a large rear addition, compatible with the original structure. The doors and windows are also replacements.The original clapboard has been covered over with aluminum siding. The enclosed lower verandah has been opened up with a replacement railing.

EVALUATION: B: Of importance. Elgible for designation at the owners' request.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:

Built circa 1894 by Charles Coleman with his brothers A. B. and James, who were then the Village of Burlington's major builders, this frame structure has retained many of the architectural features characteristic of Coleman houses. The two-level front verandah, open at ground lwel but now enclosed at the second level, has decorative carpentry work. The front gable is embellished with the original fish-scale shingles, defined by a lower band with relief rosettes, and bargeboard gable trim of lace-edged cutout wood. The house makes a strong contribution to the Victorian heritage streetscape of NelsonAvenue.

Designation report prepared in August 1995 by Jane Irwin.

445 Nelson AvenuePlan 65, Lot 71886*969 97
The Waldie-McCoy-Evans House (Klodt House)

HISTORY:

Plan 65 was a residential subdivision of "Villa Lots", registered in 1874 by Benjamin Eager, who had purchased the Brant Farm from John Chisholm in the 1860s. Eager's survey extended from the Lake Shore Road (not then called Water Street) to north of Ontario Street, and from St Luke's "Church Avenue" to the "Road to Hamilton" (now called Maple Avenue).

Lot 7 was sold in 1874 to Richard &Jane Street. In 1886 it was bought by William Everett Brown and then by Aurelia and George Dudley Chisholm, who took a mortgage to build this house as a summer cottage. In "A Walking Tour of Downtown Burlington 2", prepared by LACAC in 1978, it is stated that "445 and 455 [Nelson Avenue] were owned by the Chisholm brothers and were built about 1886, probably as summer cottages."

It was sold from Aurelia Chisholm's estate in 1892 to John Waldie & his wife, who had moved to Toronto in 1885, after selling his business interests in Wellington Square to William Kerns. In Toronto Waldie founded the Victoria Harbour Lumber Company and in 1877 he was elected to Parliament as the Reform member for Halton County. He continued to be a supporter of Knox Presbyterian Church, donating twelve imported stained-glass windows in 1877. He also built the first library building in Burlington in 1906, donating 6,000 books to its collection, and donated the land for Greenwood Cemetery, where the Waldie family plot is located. (Dorothy Turcotte, Memories of Pioneer Days,pp.186-188) It is not known whether the Waldie family stayed here in the summers. (Their family photograph shows eleven children!)

After two summers, the Waldies sold this property in 1894 to John McCoy and his wife. According to Stanley Blair, this was the summer home of the McCoy family. McCoy may have been related to William McCoy, who settled on Dundas Street in 1806 and became well known as a merchant in the village of Nelson, the publisher of a newspaper called The Little Wasp, and a partner in a furniture factory at Curnminsville. (Memoriesof Pioneer Days, pp. 110-111).The Halton Voters List of 1867 lists William J. McCoy, a merchant, at Con 1, Lot 16, and Oscar McCoy, aged 32, also a merchant, at Con 1, Lot 13. More research is needed on the McCoy family.

In 1903it was bought by Harry Freeman, one of the family after whom the hamlet of Freeman was named. In 1917 it was sold from his estate to Sarah & George Evans. According to Stanley Blair, this was a retirement home for George Evans, who had owned the Woods Farm; Perhaps he had bought the John Wood (or Woods) orchard property; the 1840 homestead for that property is still standing, now part of a lumber yard at 3265- 69 North Service Road. The 1919 Voters List includes Geo. Evans, Engineer, and Mrs Sarah Evans, M[arried] W[oman], on Lot 7, Nelson. The 1922 Telephone Directory lists Geo. Evans as residing on Nelson.

In 1946 Sarah Evans, his widow, sold this property to Blake Springer. It remained in the Springer family until 1972. Its present owners are Roy & Wendy Howarth.

Designation Bylaw......1997

ARCHITECTURE:

This one-and-a-half storey end-gabled structure is built in a traditional vernacular style, with a three-bay front elevation and a centre gable above an arched window, which is characteristic of an earlier period. Perhaps the possibility of its having been built on John Chisholm's property before 1886 should not be ruled out. The central front entrance has a transom; it and the lower windows have segmental heads. The windows have retained their two-over-two wood sash. This is said to be a very early concrete structure - or is it brick or stone? The surface is parged with lines imitating freestone masonry, like the walls of Locust Lodge (2477 Glenwood School Drive). A rubblestone basement extends under part of the structure. There is a one-storey rear frame addition.

ENVIRONMENT:

Nelson Avenue has long been recognized as a heritage streetscape of great significance in downtown Burlington. This house and its neighbours are illustrated in Helga Loverseed's Burlington: An Illustrated History. The property owners on Nelson Avenue have been strong conservationists of the heritage streetscape. Two of the earliest designations in Burlington were 470 and 479 Nelson Avenue (both in 1982). 455 Nelson Avenue was recognized by a Heritage Award in 1992 and designated in 1993. In The Downtown Urban Design & Building Facade Improvement Study (1989) it was recommended that the Nelson Avenue area be designated as a Heritage Conservation District. Momentum 88 included Nelson Avenue in an area whose "homes represent a valuable urban resource and make a significant contribution to the character of the Downtown". Located across from the Burlington Art Centre and Brock Park, this house is a neighbourhood landmark.

USABILITY:

Frame outbuildings have been expanded and renovated for use as studio space.

INTEGRITY:

The property is well maintained. An old LACAC photograph (from circa 1978) shows an add-on enclosed front porch. Around the front entrance there is now a replacement classical frame with pilasters, and the enclosed porch with side steps has been replaced with unroofed central porch. The panelled shutters are also replacements. Awarded a Heritage Award in 1996 for cosmetic renovations.

EVALUATION: A: Of major significance.Worthy of designation

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:

Built in 1886 for George Chisholm, this was for many years a summer house, part of the early "summer resort" aspect of old Burlington. It was owned by John Waldie and his family in the 1890s,and then was a summer cottage for the John McCoy family until 1903. It was afterwards owned by Harry Freeman, and from 1917 to 1946 was the home of George Evans and his wife when they had retired from farming. The one-and-a-half storey end-gabled structure is built in a traditional vernacular style that is characteristic of an earlier period: it has a three-bay front elevation and a centre gable above an arched window. The walls are parged with lines imitating freestone masonry. The property makesaverystrongcontributiontotheheritagestreetscapeofNelsonAvenue.

STORIES BEIND LOCAL PLACE NAMES - NELSON AVE

Hamilton Spectator Tuesday July 9, 2013

THE PLACE: Nelson Avenue is in Burlington and runs north-south between Lakeshore Road and Ontario Street. It is between Brant Street and Maple Avenue, just west of downtown Burlington.

THE NAME: It is named for Admiral Horatio Nelson, the hero of the 1805 Battle of Trafalgar. The seat battle was fought off the coast of Spain between the Royal Navy and the combined French forces of the Emperor Napoleon and the Spanish Navy. The British victory confirmed British supremacy of the sea well into the 20th century.

THE STORY: According to the book Burlington’s Streets, and 1874 sub-division plan by Benjamin Eager laid out Nelson Avenue. The avenue was located in what was then Nelson Township. The township was named for the admiral in 1806. Burlington annexed Nelson Township in 1958.

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